Friday, May 3, 2013

Regulars and Newcomers

A newcomer and a first for me is seeing a Yellow Warbler.  It was quite a challenge to get these weak shots nevermind a glimpse.

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Sounds of the Yellow Warbler (male)

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Sounds of the Northern Cardinal (male)

There are so many different and yet similar looking sparrows, they too pose a challenge even with a field guide book.

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Sounds of the Song Sparrow

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Song Sparrow

Thanks for visiting!


8 comments:

Buttons said...

Awesome Cardinal shot about the Yellow Warbler I have never seen one. The unknown is flying around here too:) B

Gail Dixon (Louisiana Belle) said...

Such a pretty warbler! I've not had the good fortune to see this one. The sparrows drive me nuts because they are so hard to identify. Is that one a song sparrow? Or maybe a swamp sparrow?

eileeninmd said...

Love the yellow warbler, they are gorgeous! I think your unknown is a Song Sparrow! Happy Weekend!

TexWisGirl said...

i'd have guessed song sparrow, too. :)

i love catching a glimpse of the yellow warbler!

Red said...

Yellow warbler...professional songster , but always well hidden in the top of a tree. The sparrow...clay colored.

Stephen Hayes said...

My mental paint brush is working hard on these warblers. So much purple would be required to make yellow turn into these tones. Beautiful.

Crafty Gardener said...

I've been posting about the different sparrows, they are many and all so alike. I'm trying to sort them out and then along comes the female and it starts all over again. Lovely warblers.

Kellie said...

Your sparrow is indeed a Song Sparrow. Besides the thick stripes on the breast and belly, the thick, white malar streak (=stripe leading from the base of the bottom part of the bill and extending past the side of the throat) and the large 'triangle' of brown beside it are good features to go by. Swamp Sparrows and Clay-colored Sparrows lack the streaking on the breast/belly. When learning the sparrows, it might behoove you to first separate the species between those with streaks on the breast/belly and those without. Then learn the facial patterns. Of course, you can omit those that do not occur regionally, as well.